Categories
garden

Any ideas about these little gems

I’ve been told they are indigenous and that they are also used as a protection plant of sorts in Zulu culture. That is all I know. Anyone got any more to say?

Who are you little spikey plant?
Who are you little spiky plant?
Categories
indigenous tree

Honeysuckle up a tree

Just a short post – my Cape Honeysuckle has trailed up a Wild Fig tree and is flowering in the top branches.  The bright orange contrasts strikingly with the dark green fig leaves and as the tree grows its going to drag the honeysuckle up with it.  Its the start of a wonderful relationship …

Honeysuckle up a  tree.
Honeysuckle up a tree.
Categories
indigenous

Indigenous Lantana

I remember as a kid getting lectured at school about the evils of lantana – I think I even went on a school trip to clear it out of our neighbourhood. Back then it was the number one invader species in Durban and everyone was out to get it (see more about invader species and, in particular, the Syringa berry in an upcoming guest post by Grant).

Imagine my surprise when a few years back I saw lantana for sale at my local, indigenous nursery.  Well, it turns out there is an indigenous species of lantana, with exactly the same flower and leaf structure as the invader.  The main differences are that this one is low-growing ground-cover as opposed to a shrub and the flowers are yellow as opposed to purple.  Plus, it is a great plant to have in your garden.  It flowers throughout the summer and the butterflies really dig it.

Lantana in bloom.
Lantana in bloom.
Categories
indigenous

Beautiful Ruttyruspolia

My Ruttyruspolia (semi-deciduous shrub, family acanthaceae) is currently flowering.  It has scrambled into a nearby coral tree and the flowers are hanging down between the branches, in great swoops.

Ruttyruspolia in flower.
Ruttyruspolia in flower.
Categories
indigenous tree

What tree is this?

This tree was growing in my garden when we moved in.  Someone told me it was indigenous but I don’t have its proper name and couldn’t source it in any of my books.

It has a thick, rough bark, thin leaves and long, pod-shaped seeds, but what I really like about it are its flowers.  They are light, candy-striped and kinda Japanese.  Also, the seeds are really easy to germinate and I am growing a bonsai version of it.

Does anyone know what it is called and where it is from?

What tree is this?
What tree is this?