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Sprig is six-and-a-half years, 1132 posts, 785 tags and 3401 comments old. We have some new, exciting, and time-consuming projects on the go, so to create new space, time and energy for these, it is time to say goodbye to our old friend, Sprig… The website is inactive but will be kept online as an archive.
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Thanks to all those who have kept the blog alive over the years by reading, contributing and commenting. Without you, it would have petered out long ago…

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environment sustainability

The Shore Break

Two cousins, one proposed mining project on ancestral land and a battle of epic proportions.In the Amadiba area, on South Africa’s stunning Wild Coast, the Pondo people have tended their traditional way of life for centuries. Nonhle, a young local eco-tour guide, is a staunch supporter of her people and the endangered environment on which their livelihood and culture depend. Her cousin Madiba, a local entrepreneur and self-proclaimed modernizer, is fully supportive of a titanium-mining proposal and the government’s controversial plan to build a tolled highway across their land. Tired of his community living without good access to employment, hospitals and schools, Madiba uses every backhanded method imaginable, scurrilously courting private capital and questionable government officials. While the South African President deposes the pro-environment Pondo Royal Family, Nonhle rallies inspiring support with little more than dogged determination.
Featuring arresting cinematography, beautiful sand animation and sensational original music, The Shore Break delivers both a visually and emotionally riveting fight to the finish. See the trail below and more on this debate HERE and HERE.

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garden

The Witness Garden Show 2015

See press release HERE.

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environment recycling sustainability

South Africa’s Plastic Recycling Statistics for 2014

During 2014 1,084,400 tons of plastic waste was sent to South African landfills. This is according to the latest plastic recycling statistics released by PlasticsSA.  PlasticsSA commissions research into the status quo of the plastic recycling industry each year. The information is gathered by interviewing recyclers from around the country and intends to provide valuable data for the industry, government and other stakeholders. Anton Hanekom, Executive Director of Plastics SA explains the need for this research. “It gives us a clear indication of the flow of plastics products in South Africa, the state of the plastics recycling industry and the recycling markets. It is therefore a valuable tool for promotion, knowledge of the industry, forward planning and policy development.”

The 2014 results show that the amount of plastics converted from local production and imported materials in South Africa remains the same from the previous year at 1,400,000 tons. There has been a slight increase in 2014, 22.5% of plastic waste produced was recovered and recycled compared to the 20% of the previous year. “Although this is the same total as was reported for 2013, the conversion rates for certain types of plastics have increased and others decreased in tonnages owing to the impact of light-weighting plastics packaging, which had a marked increase on South Africa’s consumption rate, asserts Hanekom. A recovery of 32.9% of all plastics packaging material has been achieved.

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The majority of plastics that are recycled in South Africa are used locally to manufacture new products, mainly films (packaging, building and industrial) and pipes. Of the 315,600 tons of plastics diverted from landfill in 2014, 90.2% was recycled locally; the remaining 9.85% which amounts to 31,087 tons were exported for recycling elsewhere. While this represents a slight increase from the previous year, the industry has witnessed a significant drop since 2009, when 97.6% of recovered waste was recycled in South Africa. Hanekom further explains that it is a challenging period for the industry, “Not only are we facing increased electricity, transport and raw material costs on the local front, but the sharp increase in imports also poses a very real threat to our progress.”

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Employment in the sector

According to the statistics, 47420 people are employed by the industry’s informal sector and 6037 people by the formal sector. Overall, job creation in the industry increased by 11.4% in 2014 compared to the previous year. There are 221 recycling companies in South Africa and an estimated 1800 converters in the industry, most of which are Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMME’s).

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The future of recycling

On the future of the recycling industry, Hanekom is confident that South Africa is on the right track. “South Africa is being recognized as one of the world leaders when it comes to “closing the loop”, or recycling products back into their original form.  Whilst our first choice will always be to recycle plastics for re-use, we are investigating waste-to-energy recovery options for difficult to recycle or end-of-life plastics that could provide a viable answer to our country’s current electricity crisis, save natural resources and support our objectives of saving landfill space, reducing litter, saving energy and reducing carbon dioxide emissions.”

Source: Urban Earth

 

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garden indigenous tree

Help identifying tree often used in landscaping

I would like to know the common and/or scientific name of this tree if anyone can help? I believe its indigenous and now often used for roadside landscaping. Any clues?

Chris
Cape Town