Categories
succulent

Aeonium arboreum

I got this little guy from my friend Sue a while back.  It has thin, slightly fleshy leaves that grow in a radial from the centre of the plant and has golden-yellow flowers in the spring (I’m still waiting to see the flowers).  This plant currently has one stem but they normally grow more branches.

Surprisingly, another succulent I thought was South African is not.  This one originates in the Canary Islands!

Aeonium arboreum.
Aeonium arboreum.
Categories
indigenous

Indigenous Lantana

I remember as a kid getting lectured at school about the evils of lantana – I think I even went on a school trip to clear it out of our neighbourhood. Back then it was the number one invader species in Durban and everyone was out to get it (see more about invader species and, in particular, the Syringa berry in an upcoming guest post by Grant).

Imagine my surprise when a few years back I saw lantana for sale at my local, indigenous nursery.  Well, it turns out there is an indigenous species of lantana, with exactly the same flower and leaf structure as the invader.  The main differences are that this one is low-growing ground-cover as opposed to a shrub and the flowers are yellow as opposed to purple.  Plus, it is a great plant to have in your garden.  It flowers throughout the summer and the butterflies really dig it.

Lantana in bloom.
Lantana in bloom.
Categories
recycling sustainability

Earth Green Recycling

This post is not specifically about gardening but more about the environment and specifically recycling.  There is a great company that has recently started operating in Durban called Earth Green Recycling.  They offer a service where, for only R50.00 per month, they will come and collect all your recyclables, i.e. paper, plastic, cans and bottles.

They then distribute it to recycling centres saving you the time and effort. They also collect old cooking oil which is converted to biodiesel by Ecologic.

Website: www.earthgreen.co.za

Categories
indigenous

Beautiful Ruttyruspolia

My Ruttyruspolia (semi-deciduous shrub, family acanthaceae) is currently flowering.  It has scrambled into a nearby coral tree and the flowers are hanging down between the branches, in great swoops.

Ruttyruspolia in flower.
Ruttyruspolia in flower.
Categories
indigenous tree

What tree is this?

This tree was growing in my garden when we moved in.  Someone told me it was indigenous but I don’t have its proper name and couldn’t source it in any of my books.

It has a thick, rough bark, thin leaves and long, pod-shaped seeds, but what I really like about it are its flowers.  They are light, candy-striped and kinda Japanese.  Also, the seeds are really easy to germinate and I am growing a bonsai version of it.

Does anyone know what it is called and where it is from?

What tree is this?
What tree is this?