Categories
garden tree

River Indigo (not a hippie love child)

Despite a name that suggests a love child of the ’60s, River Indigo (Indigofera Frutescens) is a most practical small tree and a forest ‘starter’ that grows like lightening. I planted one to replace an exotic and thought it was going to take years to rise to the challenge. Eight months later it has almost tripled in size. It also is awash with the most beautiful dark pink to light pink flowers and has pretty much been flowering all spring and summer. It’s a lovely sight to behold. It likes a bit of shade, and apparently needs to be pruned after flowering has ended. I love my River Indigo, and it’s easy to forgive her her slightly dodgy name.

The super fast one
The super fast one
Categories
tree

Amazing orange leaves

I was in Swaziland, at the Mkhaya National Park, when I saw this amazing tree with these deep, orange leaves.  I don’t know much about the tree but have always loved the photograph so I thought I’d share it.

Amazing orange leaves.
Amazing orange leaves.
Categories
indigenous tree

Honeysuckle up a tree

Just a short post – my Cape Honeysuckle has trailed up a Wild Fig tree and is flowering in the top branches.  The bright orange contrasts strikingly with the dark green fig leaves and as the tree grows its going to drag the honeysuckle up with it.  Its the start of a wonderful relationship …

Honeysuckle up a  tree.
Honeysuckle up a tree.
Categories
indigenous insects soil succulent tree

Ipomoea

I picked up this interesting-looking pot plant last week at the Shongweni Farmers Market (for a cool R100!).  The guy selling it didn’t have much information for me but could tell me it was part of the Ipomoea family.

From Wikipedia, “The genus Ipomoea (Greek Ips, Ipos, worm or bindweed and Homoeos, resembling, referring to the twining habit) is the largest in the family Convolvulaceae, with over 500 species. Most of these are called “morning glories”, but this can refer to related genera also. The genus occurs throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world, and comprises annual and perennial herbaceous plants, lianas, shrubs and small trees; most of the species are twining climbing plants.”

After a bit of Googling, I think it may be Ipomoea lapathifolia as the leaf structure looks similar … check it out here.

Ipomoea?
Ipomoea?
Categories
indigenous tree

What tree is this?

This tree was growing in my garden when we moved in.  Someone told me it was indigenous but I don’t have its proper name and couldn’t source it in any of my books.

It has a thick, rough bark, thin leaves and long, pod-shaped seeds, but what I really like about it are its flowers.  They are light, candy-striped and kinda Japanese.  Also, the seeds are really easy to germinate and I am growing a bonsai version of it.

Does anyone know what it is called and where it is from?

What tree is this?
What tree is this?