Categories
insects

Strange bug

Having lived in England, I am conscious of the amount and variety of bugs we have in Durban, especially in summer. But this one in particular caught my attention. I was sitting in my lounge one night and heard an unusual whining sound, like that of an animal. I looked around the house  for the source of the sound and eventually found this large, luminous green insect, and manage to snap a few pics. Has anyone come across this bug and heard the weird noise it makes?

Strange bug 1
Strange bug 1
Categories
flowers food garden indigenous insects

Bats in Trouble!!

I came across some papers I had lying around, one of which was a Bat Interest Group of KZN pamphlet. Is it good to have bats in the garden? What do they do? Which plants attract them? Click below and all will be revealed (excuse the teacup stain and typos – not mine):

Bats in Trouble!
Bats in Trouble!
Categories
insects

Welcome to the bug motel!

In an article about this year’s Chelsea Flower Show, I saw a photograph of an elaborate bug hotel consisting of different sizes of wood piled up in a wire frame.  It looked great and, more importantly, performed a valuable service.

Bugs love an untidy garden.  So do I.  Piles of dead wood and leaves lying around the place are a source of food to some bugs and provide shelter for others.  So, in the spirit of attracting more insects, I have launched my first bug motel consisting of a couple of branches I pruned off a tree and a pile of fallen leaves.  Looks cosy!

The benefits of creating a habitat for insects is twofold.  Firstly, some insects prey on pests such as aphids which means you don’t have to resort to insecticides and, secondly, you start to attract more insect-eating birds into your garden.

Welcome to the bug motel!
Welcome to the bug motel!
Categories
garden indigenous insects tree

That’s a metaphor!

Following Sonya’s post on her garden in transition I came across the definition of a pupa, which is the life stage of some insects (like butterflies) undergoing transformation. In keeping with the metaphor, here is another indigenous plant to introduce to our gardens, complete with butterfly-wing leaves. I’m not sure what it is called but it produces long seed pods – I have some seedlings on the go and can distribute if anyone is keen. And to push the metaphor to completion, from the same garden (my friend’s mom’s), is a butterfly, the type your new indigenous garden will attract. I think it is called a Golden Piper.

Butter fly leaves and pods
Butter fly leaves and pods
Categories
indigenous insects

What flower is this?

A friend once commented that this shrub looked like a weed.  Wait ’til it flowers, I said.

While, its just started flowering and it is spectacular.  It has numberous clusters of small, pink flowers, which the bees are going wild for.  The problem is, I’ve forgotten its name and can’t find it in my gardening books – even though I know I’ve seen it in one before and know that it is indigenous.

Anyone recognise it and can supply us with some information?

What flower is this?
What flower is this?